SYMMETRY IN WORKMANSHIP

Paraphrasing from my thesis: On an original projectile the workmanship is the same (symmetrical) on all portions of the projectile. A resharpened projectile may exhibit a different type of workmanship in the region of resharpening. (Bradley 1982:196; Frison and Stanford 1982:71; Wheat 1975:9; Wilmsen and Roberts 1984:109). One of the findings of my thesis was the number of flake scars per unit of weight (or surface area) was greater in the region of refurbishing. This suggests that the refurbishing technique produced smaller flakes and probably was pressure flaking. The following images are examples of the change in workmanship as a result of refurbishing.

This projectile was probably a large corner notch in its original form. The edges from the proximal end (base) up to the white marks are the only edges that have not be altered. Notice the change in workmanship at these marks. This projectile has been refurbished at least two times (probably more) as determined by the narrow tip that has been created on the distal end. This narrow tip is a good example of how knees are created in the lateral edges of the blade.


This projectile is probably a distally refurbished Dalton. The edges from the proximal end up to the white marks are the only edges that have not been altered. Notice the change in workmanship at the white marks. A second indication that this projectile was refurbished is the lack of longitudinal symmetry and the presence of bevelling which destroys the cross-section symmetry .



This projectile is probably a distally refurbished Bajada. The edges from the proximal end up to the white marks are the only edges that have not been altered. Notice the change in workmanship at the white marks. A second indication that this projectile was refurbished is the bevelling which destroys the cross-section symmetry.

This projectile was created from the midsection of a larger point. Therefore, both the proximal and distal ends have been refurbished. The only evidence of the original workmanship is in the middle of the faces. The change in workmanship from the edges to the center of the faces is difficult to see, but it is there. Another clue that this projectile has been refurbished in the described manner is that the projectile is too thick for its size. Unfortunately, thickness is not visible in the image, but one might be able to get a feel for it by the heavy edge work. Also, this projectile is a good example of the lack of longitudinal symmetry.

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